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Table Pose | Prasthasana

UNDER CONSTRUCTION

Table Pose | Prasthasana

About the Pose

prastha = stable, spread, table-land on the top of a mountain; asana = posture

This pose doesn’t get a fraction of the respect it deserves but let’s change that. This is where so much can be learned safely before adding weight and complexity.

Let’s start with the wrists. Whether a practice is aimed toward athletic vinyasa or just trying to keep the body functioning well for a long time, this pose prepares the practitioner for poses with more weight borne on the wrists by providing an opportunity to simultaneously engage the flexors and extensors of the wrists, thereby opening them, strengthening them, and taking stress off of the articulating surfaces of the joints.

And then there’s the low back. This is the place to teach how to use core intelligently to stabilize and lengthen the lumbar spine- a skill that is called upon in almost every non-restorative yoga pose that there is.

Mastering this pose may only take a few minutes or it may take forever. But, please do master it before approaching Downward Facing Dog, Plank, Four Limbed Staff Pose, or any other asana bearing more weight in wrist extension.

Asana Tech Specs

Overall Tapas Ratings

STHIRASUKHASVADHYAYA

Sthira / Strength: 1 of 5

unyielding, firm, hard, solid, compact, strong, fixed, immovable, motionless, still, calm, not wavering or tottering, steady, durable, constant, steadfast, resolute, persevering


Sukha / Range of Motion: 2 of 5

yielding, ease, good space, a perfectly round axle hole

Svadhyaya / Knowledge: 2 of 5

study of the self


Practicing the Pose

Base Position

Base Position

  • Ipsum

1. Pre-Alignment: Stability Before Movement

Pre-Alignment

Mountain Pose | TadasanaAlign and Stabilize These Things

To find your Tapas Point, these things must not change position as you come into the pose.

  • Ipsum

2. Moving to the Tapas Point

The Tapas Point

Hands Up in Mountain Pose / Urdhva Hasta in TadasanaThe Tapas Point for this pose is that point where one has abducted the arms at the shoulder as far as possible, or to touching palms together, without hip flexion, elbow flexion, or lumbar extension.

The Vinyasa

  • Ipsum

3. Working at the Tapas Point

Work Like This

  • Ipsum.

4. Moving from the Tapas Point

Ipsum

Vertebral Column

Lumbar Vertebrae / Lower Back

  • Coronal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Sagittal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Transverse Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X

Thoracic Vertebrae / Upper Back

  • Coronal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Sagittal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Transverse Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X

Cervical Vertebrae / Neck

  • Coronal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Sagittal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Transverse Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
Upper Appendicular Skeleton

Scapulothoracic Joint / Shoulder blade

Multiple Planes: Position
Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X

Glenohumeral Joint / Shoulder Joint

  • Coronal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Sagittal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Transverse Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X

Humeroulnar Joint / Elbow

  • Coronal Plane: Not applicable.
    The humeroulnar joint does not normally move in the coronal plane.
  • Sagittal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Transverse Plane: Not applicable.
    The humeroulnar joint does not normally move in the transverse plane.

Proximal + Distal Radioulnar Joints / Forearm

  • Coronal Plane: Not applicable.
    The humeroulnar joint does not normally move in the coronal plane.
  • Sagittal Plane: Not applicable.
    The humeroulnar joint does not normally move in the coronal plane.
  • Transverse Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X

Wrist Area (Multiple Joints)

  • Coronal Plane: Not applicable.
    The wrist area rarely moves, in asana, in the coronal plane.
  • Sagittal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Transverse Plane: Not applicable.
    The wrist area does not normally move in the transverse plane, except for forearm rotation initiated at the distal radioulnar joint (the elbow).

Fingers (Multiple Joints)

  • Coronal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Sagittal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Transverse Plane: Not applicable.
    The fingers do not normally move in the transverse plane.
Lower Appendicular Skeleton

Acetabulofemoral Joint / Hip

  • Coronal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Sagittal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Transverse Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X

Tibiofemoral Joint / Knee

  • Coronal Plane: Not applicable.
    The tibiofemoral joint does not normally move in the coronal plane
  • Sagittal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Transverse Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X

The Talocrural Joint / Ankle

  • Coronal Plane: Not applicable.
    The talocrural joint does not move substantially, in asana, in the coronal plane.
  • Sagittal Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X
  • Transverse Plane: Not applicable.
    The talocrural joint does not move substantially, in asana, in the coronal plane

Foot (Multiple Joints)

  • Coronal Plane: Not applicable.
    The foot does not move substantially, in asana, in the coronal plane.
  • Sagittal Plane: Not applicable.
    The foot does not move substantially, in asana, in the sagittal plane.
  • Transverse Plane: Position
    Sthira: X, Sukha: X, Svadhyaya: X

3 Responses to Table Pose | Prasthasana

  1. yogatheessenceoflife March 1, 2018 at 12:51 pm #

    Nice post and very useful information!Thank you for sharing.

  2. Tina Bennett December 1, 2017 at 11:04 pm #

    I thought Prasthasana is Llizard pose?

    • James Brown March 14, 2018 at 12:29 pm #

      It may be called that by some folks, There is very little agreement about what a lot of these poses are called. Especially ones like this, which are most probably modern additions to what is considered to be a yoga pose worthy of naming. The rationale behind calling this Prasthasana is that “prastha” translates to table. I wonder if somewhow the term “pratisurya” which roughly translates to mean “basking in the sun like a lizard” got turned into prasthasana somehow along the way.

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